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  • The Best MSG

    We sell the best and purest MSG available anywhere. More

  • Delicious

    When properly used, MSG makes ordinary dishes extraordinary. More

  • Proven Safe

    If our MSG makes you sick, we'll refund your money. More

  • Heart Healthy

    Adding MSG allows you to reduce sodium while preserving taste. More

Take the MSG Challenge: See What You've Been Missing!

Less than 2% of the population suffer from MSG allergies. If our products make you or your family feel unwell, return the order and we'll refund your money. Satisfaction is guaranteed.

The History of MSG

Asians had originally used the “kombu” seaweed’s broth as a flavor enhancer, without understanding that glutamic acid was its flavor-enhancing component. In 1908, a multi-million-dollar industry was born when Professor Kikunae Ikeda of the University of Tokyo isolated monosodium glutamate using kombu. He noted that the Glutamate had a distinctive taste, different from sweet, sour, bitter and salty; he gave this taste the name “umami”. Umami, translates roughly to savory or meaty in the English language – or as Vogue food writer Jeffrey Steingarten once described it, “Supreme Deliciousness!” Read more

MSG Safety

MSG was first condemned in 1968, when a physician, Robert Ho Man Kwok, contacted the New England Journal of Medicine with a letter describing Chinese Restaurant Syndrome. “[It] usually begins 15 to 20 minutes after I have eaten the first dish, and lasts for about two hours,” noted Kwok. “The most prominent symptoms are numbness at the back of the neck, gradually radiating to both arms and the back, general weakness, and palpitations.” Read more

What is Glutamate in Food?

Although glutamate is naturally occurring in many foods, it is frequently added as a flavor enhancer. Foods containing large amounts of free glutamate, such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheese have long been used to obtain savory flavors in dishes. In fact, we consume about 20–40 times more naturally occurring glutamate in the food that we eat than we do MSG. Read more