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Poultry Seasoning

Poultry seasoning might remind you of Thanksgiving, as it is commonly used to flavor the turkey stuffing. It is used to enhance the taste of dishes through rubbing and stuffing. It can be rubbed on chicken, used in stuffing, or added to barbeque sauce.

Ingredients

  • Sage: A perennial, evergreen shrub, sage is native to the Mediterranean region, though it has naturalized in many places throughout the world. It has a long history of medicinal and culinary use. It has a savory, slightly peppery flavor.
  • Thyme: Ancient Egyptians used thyme for embalming. The ancient Greeks used it in their baths and burnt it as incense in their temples, believing it was a source of courage. Today, thyme is used in cooking to impart a subtle and dry flavor with a hint of mint.
  • Celery Seed Powder: In temperate countries, celery is grown for its very small fruit. These “seeds” can be used as flavoring or spice, either whole or ground. It has a slightly bitter taste like celery.
  • Bay Leaves: Fresh or dried bay leaves are used in cooking for their distinctive flavor and fragrance. The leaves are often used to flavor soups, stews, and braises. The fresh leaves are very mild and do not develop their full flavor until several weeks after being picked. When dried, the fragrance is herbal, floral, and somewhat similar to oregano and thyme.
  • Rosemary: This woody herb with fragrant, needle-like leaves is native to the Mediterranean region. The leaves, both fresh and dried, are used in traditional Mediterranean cuisine. They have a bitter, astringent taste and are highly aromatic, which complements a wide variety of foods.
  • Marjoram: A perennial herb with sweet, subtle, and delicate pine and citrus flavors.

 

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Lemon Pepper Seasoning

Our MSG-enhanced Lemon Pepper Seasoning adds depth and zest to a wide range of dishes. It works well with meats (particularly chicken), vegetables, and pasta, although it was originally used primarily for fish.

Ingredients

  • Black Pepper: The King of Spices, black pepper is a flowering vine, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. Peppercorns are the most widely traded spice in the world, accounting for twenty percent of all spice imports.
  • Granulated Garlic: Garlic powder has a different taste from fresh garlic. If used as a substitute for fresh garlic, 1/8 teaspoon of garlic powder is equivalent to one clove of garlic. It has a strong and intense profile.
  • Citric Acid: Citric acid is a weak organic acid. It is a natural preservative/conservative and is also used to add an acidic, or sour, taste to foods.

 

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Tandoori Spice

Our Tandoori Spice combines a blend of spices (coriander, cumin, nutmeg, red pepper, garlic, paprika and onion) with our own MSG. It pairs well with chicken and pork and offers a unique taste that is also a bit spicy.

While most people think of tandoori as a seasoning, in fact it is a cooking method using a tandoor – a clay oven found in traditional north Indian, Pakistani and Afghan cooking. You can make Tandoori Chicken quickly by skewing a half of chicken, seasoning well and cooking it over intense heat.

Ingredients

  • Coriander: All parts of the coriander plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds are the parts most commonly used in cooking. Coriander is common in South Asian, Middle Eastern, and Mediterranean cuisine. It offers a sweet, pleasant taste with a hint of citrus and is often described as a cross between sage and lemon.
  • Cumin: Originally cultivated in Iran and Mediterranean region, cumin is mentioned in the Bible in both the Old Testament and the New Testament. The ancient Greeks kept cumin at the dining table in its own container; this practice continues in Morocco. Cumin has a slightly bitter, warm and powerful taste.
  • Nutmeg: Nutmeg is the seed of the tree used for flavoring many dishes, usually in ground or grated form. In Indian cuisine, nutmeg is used in many sweet as well as savory dishes. It has a strong, warm, nutty and sweet flavor profile.
  • Crushed Red Pepper Flakes: Made from hot dried red peppers, crushed red pepper flakes offer an easy way to add some heat to any dish. Crushed red pepper shakers have become standard fare at Italian restaurants and especially pizza parlors in the U.S.
  • Granulated Garlic: Garlic powder has a different taste from fresh garlic. If used as a substitute for fresh garlic, 1/8 teaspoon of garlic powder is equivalent to one clove of garlic. It has a strong and intense profile.
  • Paprika: Paprika is a spice made from the ground, dried fruits of either bell pepper or chili pepper varieties. The seasoning is used in many cuisines to add color and flavor to dishes. It has a warm, sweet, peppery and pleasant taste.
  • Onion Powder: Onion powder is ground, dehydrated onion. It is a common seasoning and is typically used in pasta, pizza, and chicken preparations. It adds a pungent, sharp, and savory note to dishes.

 

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Italian Seasoning

Our Italian seasoning is a mixture of many herbs (marjoram, sage, basil, thyme, and oregano) combined with MSG. Sprinkle it on potatoes, in soups, or in sauces for an Italian. It also works well in pasta dishes, on pizza, in tomato sauce, or when added to chicken parmesan. No sodium.

Ingredients

  • Marjoram: A perennial herb with sweet, subtle, and delicate pine and citrus flavors.
  • Sage: Sage is a perennial, evergreen shrub, with woody stems, grayish leaves, and blue to purplish flowers. It is native to the Mediterranean region, though it has naturalized in many places throughout the world. It has a long history of medicinal and culinary use. It has a savory, slightly peppery flavor.
  • Basil: Basil, or Sweet Basil, originated in India, but is best known as a culinary herb prominently featured in Italian cuisine. It also plays a major role in the Northeast Asian cuisine of Taiwan and the Southeast Asian cuisines of Indonesia and Thailand. It has a sweet, delicate, and pleasant flavor.
  • Thyme: Ancient Egyptians used thyme for embalming. The ancient Greeks used it in their baths and burnt it as incense in their temples, believing it was a source of courage. Today, thyme is used in cooking to impart a subtle and dry flavor with a hint of mint.
  • Oregano: Part of the mint family, oregano is found in warm-temperate Europe and the Mediterranean. Oregano is an important culinary herb, used for the flavor of its leaves, which can be more flavorful when dried than fresh. It has an aromatic, warm and slightly bitter taste.

 

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